If you’ve got to have chemotherapy, did you know you could have it at home?

One of the perks of my job was private medical insurance; in fact I’ve always had it, but never needed to use it until I was diagnosed with breast cancer.  As you may know, medical insurance cover has many benefits; for me it meant choice as to when and where I had my treatment.  What I have been amazed to learn since then is that many patients can now get the same choices on the NHS!

This choice meant I could have chemotherapy in the comfort of my own home or I could have it in hospital with several other patients, at the same time, in the same room.  Being with others in the same situation can be a real help for some people. You can chat about the changes to your body, exchange views and even have a laugh, though you may still get chance to do this at patient group meetings or when you go for your check-up.  For those who’d prefer more privacy during their treatment, just don’t want to talk, or don’t feel well enough for company, this is torture.  I opted for home treatment.  I’d feel at ease and, more importantly, my children could see chemotherapy in action.  It’s common sense I know, but understanding diminishes fear and I believe that being able to watch me having cups of tea, chatting to my wonderful cancer nurse Elaine, and generally being relaxed during each session was an enormous relief to everyone. Me too.

When the day arrived for my first chemotherapy session, I had no time to be apprehensive, as I had to attend a client meeting that morning. (I had been told to have a very peaceful day before the treatment to prepare my body for the drugs, but circumstances at work made this impossible.) The meeting ran on and I had to race home to be there before Elaine.  We arrived virtually at the same time, and then a procedure began that would be replicated over the next six months.  I would sit in a comfortable chair with a drip next to me, a hot wheat bag, straight from my microwave, placed on my arm to warm it up before the drugs (which had been refrigerated) were administered.  While I was being warmed up, Elaine would ask me all sorts of questions before showing me the drugs and confirming the dosages with me.  She would then insert a cannula into my hand, through which all the chemotherapy drugs would be infused (which means the drugs were very gradually introduced into my body).  First though, a saline drip was set up. This would dilute the drugs as they were injected into my veins; a necessary precaution as chemotherapy drugs are, literally, poisonous and would seriously damage my veins without dilution.  Your veins may be damaged – you’ll know if this has happened because your arm will become too painful for intravenous medication – so you’ll have to change arms.  It did to me and I had to keep changing arms after my fourth treatment.

In addition to the chemotherapy drugs, anti-sickness medication and steroids were also injected, so the whole process would take between two and three hours.  The first session passed off without incident, and the children were home from school in time to see me “plumbed in.”  Once Elaine had left, the children and my sister kept checking that I was still OK.  I actually felt no different, but nevertheless we all waited for me to spontaneously combust.

After my first session, I felt no apprehension or fear.  Of course, I didn’t always feel on top of the world, but I could at least face the world.  And, as this was going to be my regime every three weeks, for the next six months, and it was helping me get better, how could I resent it?

If you’d like to know more about having your chemotherapy at home, you should contact a wonderful organisation called Healthcare at Home (www.hah.co.uk) who looked after me.  Their expert nurses give chemotherapy to thousands of patients each year in the comfort of their own homes, and most of this treatment is actually paid for by the NHS rather than private insurance. Strange but true, drugs administered in the community, in other words ‘at home’, are exempt from VAT, so that alone begins to make home treatment financially attractive for the NHS.  Add to that the resulting reduction in waiting times in outpatients and the pharmacy, the freeing up of valuable nursing staff and fewer patients needing hospital transport, there is no wonder that more and more NHS Trusts are taking home treatment more seriously.

If a home service is not offered to you by your doctor, whether you are an insurance patient or an NHS patient, just ask; there’s every chance that he or she is unaware that home treatment is available.  Your doctor should contact Healthcare at Home, and they will be able to give advice as to what is possible, so that you and your doctor can then decide whether home treatment is the best option for you. 

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